Slavery and the Slave Trade in Ethiopia and Beyond

 

SLAFNET Summer School
15-18 April 2019
Institute of Ethiopian Studies, Addis Ababa University

 

Slavery and the slave trade have been an important historical feature of the Horn of Africa region. Consecutive regional polities executed slave raids into their respective hinterland well into the 20th century. The internal Ethiopian slave trade connected the political centers of Ethiopia with its peripheries, and the trade in slaves connected Ethiopia with the Red Sea  and the Indian Ocean world as well as with the Ottoman world. Various polities in the Horn of Africa were depended on, and were commercial centers for, slave labor. The regional contours of slavery are relatively well established. Despite the diversity of various forms of human bondage, slavery and serfdom, as well as the trade in slaves, and its relatively rich documentation, slavery has received little attention in the field of Eastern Africa’s social, cultural and economic history. Moreover, one feature of Ethiopia is the public silence and the absence of commemorative discourses among the descendants of owner groups, slave descendants as well as within the public sphere.

Continuer la lecture de Slavery and the Slave Trade in Ethiopia and Beyond

The Developmental State Seen Through the Prism of an Emergence of a Domestic Industrialist Class in Ethiopia

The Developmental State Seen Through the Prism of an Emergence of a Domestic Industrialist Class in Ethiopia: The Case of the Metals and Engineering Sector

By Sibulele NKunzi (PhD candidate, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa)

Date: Thursday December 6, 2-4 pm

Venue: Berhanou Abebe Library,  French Centre for Ethiopian Studies  (Jan Meda, https://goo.gl/maps/sutSritp3MU2)

Ethiopia is achieving rapid economic growth and development despite historic and current challenges. Ethiopia is an exemplary 21st century case of bridging the continental wide gap in African indigenous productive capitalists by using state-owned enterprises, military-owned enterprises, party-owned firms, and strategic links and joint ventures with foreign investors to build a productive-and-patriotic class of domestic capitalists, albeit nascent at this point in time. Recognizing that reciprocal control mechanisms (RCMs) are the linchpin of industrial policy success, the research explores how they are managed in Ethiopia when such firms can prove hard to discipline.

Through a political economy lens, the research focuses on the significance of relatively complex manufacturing sectors. An examination of industry trends such as investment, trade, productivity, building of domestic technological, research and industrial capabilities is carried out through a focus on a particular case study: Ethiopia’s metals and engineering industry.  The sector is considered “complex” in this context given Ethiopia’s low-level of manufacturing capabilities, human capital and education, and non-existent comparative advantages. The case is interpreted in light of the developmental state with respect to the business-state-relationships (BSR) between the state and capital; in particular the bargains that the state makes with an industrialist class as some industrial policy instruments contextually become more and others less important in the support of the industry. The research aims to highlight the challenges associated with learning from failure on a national, sectoral and firm level, including institutionally in terms of policy.

The case-study is an attempt to move the developmental state literature forward by grappling with the pendulum question of the possibility of industrial policy at national level in an era of globalized production structures and networks. The argument in my research is that those in the academic fraternity as well as policy making authorities in aspirant African developmental states should consider those dimensions of industrial policy that are evident in Ethiopia’s ambitious Growth and Transformation Plan, which in effect challenge the pessimism associated with low-income countries turning to complex manufacturing structures. It is argued that though such ambition is often questioned by neoclassical economists, such an “over optimism” and the associated “hiding hand” (as Hirschmann (2002) referred to it) is often associated with important developmental effects.

The speaker 

Sibulele Nkunzi is a second year PhD Candidate in Applied Development Economics at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa. His PhD focuses on industrial policy and political economy dimensions of the Ethiopian developmental state. His research and teaching interests are in fieldwork-led academic and policy work with a focus on industrialization, industrial policy, labour, trade, technology, as well as methodological debates in economics.

CFEE Seminar: Ethiopia and its Islamic environment in the Middle Ages: The ERC project and its fieldwork in Bilet (Tigray)

Ethiopia and its Islamic environment in the Middle Ages: The ERC project and its fieldwork in Bilet (Tigray)

By Deresse Ayenachew (Debre Berhan University), Amélie Chekroun (CNRS, IREMAM, Aix-en-Provence), Bertrand Hirsch (Paris-1 Sorbonne University) and Julien Loiseau (Aix-Marseille University)

Date: Thursday November 29, 2-4 pm

Venue: Berhanou Abebe Library,  French Centre for Ethiopian Studies  (Jan Meda, https://goo.gl/maps/sutSritp3MU2)

The project pursues two hypothesis: 1) that connexions never have ceased between Ethiopia and its environment that came under Islamic domination and have even increased from the 13th century onwards; 2) that mobility of women and men, free or enslaved, commercial exchange and the flow of books and stories back and forth, did participate in the Islamisation of the whole area in the same way as in the resiliency of Ethiopian christianity. The project aims at evidencing these connexions inside the Horn, through the study of local written sources and archaeological survey, as well as outside the Horn, through the study of Arabic sources and of all traces left by men and women that came from the Horn to the Middle East.

The ERC project HornEast (Horn & Crescent. Connections, Mobility and Exchange between the Horn of Africa and the Middle East in the Middle Ages: 2017-2022) aims at evidencing local and global connections between the Horn of Africa and its Islamic environment (from Yemen to Egypt and Palestine) in the Middle Ages (7th to 15th Century), for a better understanding of the Islamisation process in the whole area.

Fieldwork has begun in Bilet (Tigray) in March 2018, revealing a Muslim graveyard with several Arabic stelae dating back to the 10th-12th centuries CE, and the remains of an urban settlement that may have worked together at the same time. First findings and research hypothesis of the fieldwork will be presented during the workshop along with an overview of the project HornEast.

The Speakers:

Julien Loiseau (Aix-Marseille University): Connecting the history of the Horn of Africa in the Middle Ages: the ERC project HornEast

Bertrand Hirsch (Paris-1 Sorbonne University): In search of the Muslim stelae from Enderta: the way to Bilet

Amélie Chekroun (CNRS, IREMAM, Aix-en-Provence): Fieldwork mission in Bilet (March 2018): preliminary observations

Julien Loiseau (Aix-Marseille University): The Muslim stelae from Bilet: a preliminary assessment

CFEE joint seminar: The Mountain Exile Hypothesis

SÉMINAIRE / SEMINAR Evolution: an international research seminar in Eastern Africa. Paleobiodiversity, paleobiology, prehistory, paleoenvironments (2015-2018) 20ème séance / 20th session: The Mountain Exile Hypothesis: How Humans Benefited from African High Altitude Ecosystems in Ethiopia par/by Ralf Vogelsang Jeudi 26 novembre 2018, 15h30-17h / Thursday, November 26, 2018, 3:30-5:00 pm Lieu /VenueAuditorium of the Authority for Research and Conservation of Cultural Heritage, Addis Ababa Continuer la lecture de CFEE joint seminar: The Mountain Exile Hypothesis

ICES 20, Mekelle University

COMPTE-RENDU DE COLLOQUE / CONFERENCE REPORT

20th International Conference of Ethiopian Studies – Mekelle University,

October 1-5, 2018

« Regional and Global Ethiopia – Interconnections ad Identities »

The Cfee was a partner of the 20th International Conference of Ethiopian Studies hosted by Mekelle University, Octobrer 1-5, 2018.

The program and book of abstracts of the 20th International Conference of Ethiopian Studies are available from the conference website: ices20-mu.org.

The conference in Mekelle was a great opportunity for us to present our books and publications, to discuss with our partners and to meet new colleagues, especially a range of promising researchers. We have attended some panels, here are our brief report. Other posts will follow with opinions and reports by researchers affiliated with the Cfee.

Continuer la lecture de ICES 20, Mekelle University

New Publication: Appréhender des situations autoritaires

Nouvelle publication / New publication

Appréhender des « situations autoritaires », lectures croisées à partir du Cameroun et de l’Éthiopie

Playing with rules in authoritarian situations. Perspectives from Cameroon and Ethiopia

Edited by Marie Morelle & Sabine Planel

L’Espace politique, Volume 38 (2), 2018 (open access)

https://journals.openedition.org/espacepolitique/4897

 

Continuer la lecture de New Publication: Appréhender des situations autoritaires

New Publication: L’Afrique ancienne. De l’Acacus au Zimbabwe.

Nouvelle publication / New publication

L’Afrique ancienne. De l’Acacus au Zimbabwe. 20 000 avant notre ère – XVIIe siècle

Edited by François-Xavier Fauvelle

Collection Mondes anciens, Belin, 2018, 680 pp.

ISBN: 978-2-7011-9836-1

Continuer la lecture de New Publication: L’Afrique ancienne. De l’Acacus au Zimbabwe.

CFEE joint seminar: bifacial tools at the Melka Wakena Acheulian site complex

SÉMINAIRE / SEMINAR Evolution: an international research seminar in Eastern Africa. Paleobiodiversity, paleobiology, prehistory, paleoenvironments

(2015-2018)

19ème séance / 19th session: Shapes and technological procedures of the bifacial tools at the Melka Wakena Acheulian site complex par/by Tegenu Gossa

Jeudi 18 octobre 2018, 15h30-17h / Thursday, October 18, 2018, 3:30-5:00 pm

Lieu /VenueAuditorium of the Authority for Research and Conservation of Cultural Heritage, Addis Ababa

Continuer la lecture de CFEE joint seminar: bifacial tools at the Melka Wakena Acheulian site complex

New book: The Trade in Papers Marked with Non-Latin Characters

Nouvelle publication / New publication

The Trade in Papers Marked with Non-Latin Characters / Le commerce des papiers à marques à caractères non-latins

Documents and History / Documents et histoire

Edited by Anne Regourd

Islamic Manuscripts and Books, Volume 15, BRILL, 2018, 268 pp., 106 illus., 8 maps

ISBN: 978-90-04-36087-7

Continuer la lecture de New book: The Trade in Papers Marked with Non-Latin Characters

Appel à candidatures : le CFEE recherche un(e) stagiaire pour 2019

APPEL À CANDIDATURES / CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

Stage pour étudiant(e) de niveau Master 1 ou 2

(Études en développement / recherches en sciences humaines et sociales / coopération et développement international)

Janvier-Juin 2019

Date limite de candidature : 15 octobre 2018

Continuer la lecture de Appel à candidatures : le CFEE recherche un(e) stagiaire pour 2019

Reception of the Ethiopian Book of Enoch

TERRAIN/FIELDWORK

Reception of the Ethiopic Book of Enoch in Medieval Gǝ‘ǝz texts:

Identification, Explanation and Analysis with Translation

by Haileyesus Alebachew Molaw

 

Haileyesus Alebachew Molaw is a lecturer at Samara University, he recently defended a PhD in Philology at Addis Ababa University under the supervision of Dr. Abba Daniel Assefa. His doctoral research was supported by a grant from the CFEE in 2017 for the study of Ethiopian manuscripts at the National Archives and Library Agency (NALA). In this text, he presents some aspects of his recently completed study.

Continuer la lecture de Reception of the Ethiopian Book of Enoch

Le blog scientifique du Centre français des études éthiopiennes (Addis-Abeba) / The scientific blog of the French Centre for Ethiopian Studies (Addis Ababa)