The Late Stone Age of the Horn of Africa: Views from the Main Ethiopian Rift

SÉMINAIRE / SEMINAR

Evolution: an international research seminar in eastern Africa.
Paleobiodiversity, paleobiology, prehistory, paleoenvironments

(2015-2016)

3ème séance / 3rd session: The Late Stone Age of the Horn of Africa: Views from the Main Ethiopian Rift, par/by Clément MÉNARD (Fyssen Foundation Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, University of Florida/Late Stone Age Sequence in Eastern Africa Project, Université de Toulouse – Jean Jaurès)

Vendredi 11 mars 2016 (16-17h30) / Friday 11 March 2016 (4:00 PM-5:30 PM). Lieu / Venue: Auditorium of the Authority for Research and Conservation of Cultural Heritage

Organisation: CFEE & Authority for Research and Conservation of the Cultural Heritage (Heritage Collection & Laboratory Service Directorate, Heritage Training Unit).

The Late Stone Age of the Horn of Africa: Views from the Main Ethiopian Rift, par/by Clément MÉNARD

ClémentAfter several decades of research, the Late Stone Age (LSA) of the Horn of Africa remains a poorly defined entity. We will present assemblages from several sites located in the Main Ethiopian Rift that were excavated recently. These include the Bulbula River sites (Ziway-Shala basin) and the Mochena Borago rockshelter (Wolayta). The analysis of the artifacts from these sites, ranging between the terminal Pleistocene (14thmillennium cal BP) and the early Holocene (12th millennium cal BP) for the Bulbula formations and the middle-late Holocene (6th-2nd millennium cal BP) for Mochena Borago, indicates a great diversity of lithic industries attributed to the LSA. These results, as well as a revision of the existing documentation at a regional scale, make it possible to distinguish a terminal Pleistocene unit with blade and bladelet industries from a middle-late Holocene one with flake-based industries. We lack elements for the early Holocene but there is apparently no link with any of the other units. Our research also shows that one of the iconic features of the period, microlithism, and more particularly the geometric forms, encompasses a greater technological diversity than previously described and plays a variable role within technological systems. Finally, we will question the importance of different climatic and geographic factors and their influence on the observed partitioning.

L’intervenant / The speaker

Clément Ménard, archéologue préhistorien, est visiting professor au au département d’anthropologie de l’Université de Floride, post-doctorant de la Fondation Fyssen, et membre du projet Late Stone Age Sequence in Eastern Africa dirigé par François Bon (Université de Toulouse – Jean Jaurès/TRACES, UMR 5608) / Clément Ménard, a prehistoric archaeologist, is a visiting professor at the Anthropology department of the University of Florida, a postdoctoral fellow of the Fyssen Foundation, and a team member of the Late Stone Age Sequence in Eastern Africa project lead by François Bon (University of Toulouse/TRACES, UMR 5608).

Organisateurs du séminaire / Convenors of the seminar series: Behailu Habte (ARCCH), Jean-Renaud Boisserie (CNRS, CFEE) & Yonas Beyene (associate researcher at CFEE, ARCC-Hawassa).

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *