Free online access: Annales d’Éthiopie vol. 31 on Persée

ANNALES D’ÉTHIOPIE vol. 31 (2016/2017)

est désormais en accès libre en ligne sur Persée / is now  available online for free on Persée.

Voir le sommaire et les résumés ci-dessous / Contents and abstracts below

L’ensemble de la collection des Annales d’Éthiopie depuis 1955 est disponible sur Persée  / The whole collection of Annales d’Éthiopie since 1955 is available on Persée.

Double special issue of Annales d’Éthiopie

« Making Heritage in Ethiopia »

&

« Different Faces of Migration in and from Ethiopia »

 

 

 

 

MAKING HERITAGE IN ETHIOPIA

Guillaume Blanc, Marie Bridonneau
Making heritage in Ethiopia / Faire le patrimoine en Éthiopie

Elisabeth Biasio, Peter R. Gerber
The Return of the Crown of Kafa from Switzerland to Ethiopia: A Case of Restitution? / Le retour de la couronne du Kafa de la Suisse à l’Éthiopie: un cas de restitution ?

Marie Huber
Making Ethiopian Heritage World Heritage. UNESCO’s Role in Ethiopian Cultural and Natural Heritage / Faire du patrimoine éthiopien un patrimoine mondial: le rôle de l’Unesco dans la reconnaissance du patrimoine culturel et naturel éthiopien

Girma Tayachew Asmelash
The Simen Wild Fauna under the Protection of the Government of Haile Selassie. From Endangered Prey to National Symbol (1941 – 1969) / La faune sauvage du Simen sous la protection du gouvernement d’Hailé Sélassié: de proie menacée à symbole national (1941-1969)

Judy Jaffe-Schagen
Creating Space. The Construction of Ethiopian Heritage and Memory in Israel / Créer l’espace: la construction d’une mémoire et d’un patrimoine éthiopiens en Israël

Zelalem Teferra
Urban Renewal and the Predicaments of Heritage Conservation in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia / Renouvellement urbain et situations délicates de la conservation du patrimoine à Addis-Abeba, Éthiopie

Perrine Duroyaume
The old residences of Addis Ababa. Discourses and practices around heritage in a city under reconstruction / Les demeures anciennes d’Addis-Abeba. Discours et pratiques autour du patrimoine dans une métropole en reconstruction

Metasebia Bekele
The Memory of Heroes: the Konso Experience / La mémoire des héros: l’expérience konso

Yohannes Gebre Selassie
The Future of the Past. Towards Conservation of Undocumented Archaeological Sites and Objects in Tegray (Ethiopia) / Le futur du passé: vers la conservation des sites et des objets archéologiques non-documentés dans le Tegray (Éthiopie)

DIFFERENT FACES OF MIGRATION IN AND FROM ETHIOPIA

David Ambrosetti, Thomas Osmond
Different Faces of Migration in and from Ethiopia (Foreword)

Mehdi Labzaé
State-sponsored migrations in Ethiopia. Peasant perceptions of political control and land policies in Ethiopia’s western lowlands / Les migrations sponsorisées par l’État en Éthiopie: Les perceptions paysannes du contrôle politique et des politiques foncières dans les basses-terres de l’Ouest éthiopien

Clara Lecadet, Medareshaw Tafesse Melkamu
The expulsion of Ethiopian workers from Saudi Arabia (2013-2014). The management of a humanitarian and political crisis / L’expulsion des travailleurs éthiopiens d’Arabie Saoudite (2013-2014): la gestion d’une crise humanitaire et politique

Thomas Osmond
Turks in Ethiopia/Ethiopians in Turkey. Transregional Circularities and South/South Bilateral Development in Globalization / Turcs en Éthiopie/Éthiopiens en Turquie: circularités trans-régionales et développement bilatéral Sud/Sud dans la mondialisation

Benoit Gaudin, Solomon Teka, Samuel Simyiu Mwanga
The Sport Migrations of East African Athletics / Les migrations sportives des athlètes est-africains

VARIA / MISCELLANEOUS

Giuseppe Ferraro
From the mountains of Africa to Italy. The experience of Ethiopian deportees confined in Longobucco (Calabria) in the period 1937-1943 / Des montagnes d’Afrique à l’Italie: L’expérience des déportés éthiopiens confinés à Longobucco (Calabre) au cours de la période 1937-1943

DOCUMENTS

Jean-François Faü
About the colophon of a 19ᵗʰ century Harari musḥaf / À propos du colophon d’un musḥaf harari du XIXᵉ siècle

COMPTE RENDU / BOOK REVIEW

Jean-François Breton
Francis Anfray & Chiara Zazzaro, 2016, Recherches archéologiques à Adoulis (Érythrée)

Les exemplaires papiers peuvent être commandés sur le site Internet des Éditions de Boccard / Hard copies can be purchased on de Boccard publishers’ website.

*************

(en français ci-dessous)

ABSTRACTS

MAKING HERITAGE IN ETHIOPIA

Elisabeth Biasio, Peter R. Gerber
The Return of the Crown of Kafa from Switzerland to Ethiopia: A Case of Restitution?
The focus of this paper is the question of whether the return of the crown and the stool of Kafa from Switzerland to Ethiopia in 1954 is a “case of restitution”. The circumstances of this return and the reasons why the crown and the stool are qualified as “resituated items” in the Institute of Ethiopian Studies are to be discussed. The story of the crown starts in the year 1897, when Emperor Menelik II conquered the kingdom of Kafa in South -West Ethiopia and came into possession of the crown of the king of Kafa. Because Menelik feared that the crown could be stolen and taken back to Kafa, he asked his Swiss adviser, the engineer Alfred Ilg, to make sure that the crown would be taken out of the country. When Emperor Haile Selassie I visited Switzerland in 1954, members of the Ilg family handed the crown over to him and he took it back to Ethiopia. Is this repatriation a case of restitution according to the “Unesco Convention 1970” or the “Unidroit Convention 1995”? How should we understand the repatriation of the crown compared to, for example, the restitution of the stele of Aksumin 2008? These questions are of interest for museum curators dealing with similar cases. The case of the crown of Kafa however seems to be a very singular one.

Marie Huber
Making Ethiopian Heritage World Heritage. UNESCO’s Role in Ethiopian Cultural and Natural Heritage
Foreign expertise has been highly relevant to the production of Ethiopian heritage from a very early point on. When Ethiopia ratified the UNESCO World Heritage Convention in 1972, this act made way for the recognition of Ethiopian heritage on an international level, supporting in turn the institutionalisation of heritage within the administration of the Ethiopian state itself. However, the presence of international organisations concerned with the conservation and development of heritage in the country, among them UNESCO, predates the arrival of World Heritage, and is a period about which little study has been done to date. This paper traces the earliest activities of UNESCO in regard to the making of Ethiopian heritage from 1960 to the 1980s in the context of the institutional development of heritage in Ethiopia. This history of the policymaking and conservation efforts existing on the ground should contribute to a larger research context that aims to understand the links between global and local heritage-making dynamics, as well as the place of institutions, both national and international, in the heritage-making process.

Girma Tayachew Asmelash
The Simen Wild Fauna under the Protection of the Government of Haile Selassie. From Endangered Prey to National Symbol (1941 – 1969)
The main objective of this paper is to reconstruct the history of the discovery of the walia ibex that led to the creation of the Simen Mountains National Park as a heritage site. Despite the fact both the physical geography of the park and the walia ibex have been well studied, little is known regarding what exactly occurred before the park was established. The study draws on research carried out in the archives of the North Gondar Zone Administration Ofce, interviews with some of the historical actors, and published as well as unpublished documents. In 1963, after the UNESCO -funded mission that found walia ibex as one of the endemic animals of Ethiopia, both the Ethiopian government and foreign agencies struggled to protect the walia ibex. The Simen Mountains National Park was established in 1969. However, during six years, while the Simen Mountains were already supposed to be ruled as part of a national park as soon as 1963, not only that the local society rejected the new laws and regulations, but the area remained a place of hunting for both the local populations and the Ethiopian representatives.

Judy Jaffe-Schagen
Creating Space. The Construction of Ethiopian Heritage and Memory in Israel
Thirty years after the 1rst mass immigration of Ethiopian Jews to Israel, the status of the Ethiopian community today numbering over 138,000 still does not approach that of the general Jewish population. Many in the government, in non-governmental organizations, and in the community, have at long last come to view acknowledgment of the Ethiopian Jewish heritage as a miracle solution to the integration problem. By looking at what has been done regarding the heritage of Ethiopian Jewish immigrants to Israel, this article sets out to determine the role that heritage and memory (can) play in the community’s integration. I will review memorials, exhibitions, and “back to your roots’ trips”, and look at the expectations government authorities, private actors, and community leaders hold for them. I will argue that emphasizing the heritage of Ethiopian Jews thirty years after their arrival in Israel will not have the anticipated effect on their integration.

Zelalem Teferra
Urban Renewal and the Predicaments of Heritage Conservation in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
This paper explores the challenges of rehabilitating and conserving early urban neighbourhoods and historic monuments of Addis Ababa in light of rapid urban redevelopment activities taking place in the city since 2004. It examines the way the need for urban physical transformation to suit the current standards of living and the modernist zeal of urban planners to improve the urban outlook through slum clearance puzzles the quest for maintaining urban heritages, reminiscent of original social fabric, urban character, and vernacular architectural features. The paper concludes with a discussion on the need for multi-dimensional approach to conserve urban cultural heritages, mainly historic buildings and monuments. It also suggests the preservation and revitalization of important early urban neighbourhoods of Addis Ababa with the objective of maintaining typical urban tissue, essential qualities of the historic areas and social life of the communities residing therein, but by adapting their physical structures and activities to present-day requirements where possible. The paper further recommends the use of innovative conservation techniques that employ the advances in modern digital technology. Towards this end, textual and digital documentation of early neighbourhoods of Addis Ababa were proposed to preserve popular memory on the one hand, and to allow the redevelopment process to keep-going uninterrupted where physical preservation of old urban fabric is deemed difficult or practically rendered impossible.

Perrine Duroyaume
The old residences of Addis Ababa. Discourses and practices around heritage in a city under reconstruction
Built during the founding of Addis Ababa by the high dignitaries of the empire, the old residences have been recognised as heritage by the public authorities since the beginning of the 1980s. Their architectural style, a blend of foreign influences stamped with an Ethiopian air, makes it a remarkable heritage in an urban landscape. Nevertheless, the successive inventories carried out by the Municipality of Addis Ababa very seldom lead to the restoration of the homes whose often unsuitable uses have accelerated their deterioration. The progressive disappearance of this heritage, amplified by urban modernisation projects, preoccupies researchers and association that regularly sound the alarm. How can we explain this gap between public recognition of the old residences, and the absence of a voluntarist policy to preserve them? As a response, this article interrogates the diverging representations regarding the place of this heritage within a capital, a symbol of a state under construction. Through the literature on Addis Ababa produced by European and Ethiopian researchers, the old residences are viewed as a witness to the founding of the Empire and of a unique social mix. Public authorities display strong contradictions and discontinuities regarding the preservation of this heritage. Beyond the tensions over the value of this heritage, this article explores the practices of owners (individuals, religious, public, and community) that maintain the buildings according to their own logics, demonstrating the diversity, but also the lack of a framework, in restoration initiatives. It concludes with a reflection on the news in the wake of the municipal decision to restore several old residences within a framework of tourism development.

Metasebia Bekele
The Memory of Heroes: the Konso Experience
The Konso culture has been promoting heroism and consequently, honouring heroes (hedalitas) whose performances are recognized by the community. The frequent wars against neighbouring communities and between different Konso villages have, to a large extent, characterized Konso History. Men who successfully kill the enemy win the respect of the society they belong to. Equally important, the one who kills one of the big wild games enjoys the same honor. Since at least 19 generations ago, the konso perception of heroism has been conveyed by erecting monuments on the graves of heroes. They immortalize their heroes by erecting monuments: wooden statues called waka and stone monuments called degadiruma. This paper tries to describe the Konso tradition of monument erection. It mainly focuses on the wooden statues, waka, and tries to present the whole process, i. e. from fabrication to erection. It also throws light on why waka should not be considered only for their artistic values, since these statueswitness how communities “inscribe” their history on their landscapes.

Yohannes Gebre Selassie
The Future of the Past. Towards Conservation of Undocumented Archaeological Sites and Objects in Tegray (Ethiopia)
The destruction and looting of archaeological sites have undermined preservation efforts of cultural heritage in Tegray. This problem has been aggravated due to the opening of new roads connecting Wereda with Tabia administrative units, as well as other development activities and urbanization. Ever since the publication of the repertoire of pre-Aksumite and Aksumite sites found in Tegray by Eric Godet four decades ago, scores of new sites are revealed to researchers. This article focuses on little known or hitherto unknown archaeological sites and archaeological materials that were recovered by villagers from different sites but have never been catalogued, neither by researchers nor by the Tegray Culture and Tourism Bureau (TCTB) and the Authority for Research and Conservation of the Cultural Heritage (ARCCH). In addition to highlighting the major factors of destruction of undocumented archaeological sites and non-catalogued material objects, the purpose of this paper is to broaden and re ne our understanding in order to combat the looting and destruction of cultural heritage in Tegray. This paper is based on the personal experience of the author as (former) tourism and heritage officer (in TCTB) as well as extensive field work conducted since March 2010.

DIFFERENT FACES OF MIGRATION IN AND FROM ETHIOPIA

Mehdi Labzaé
State-sponsored migrations in Ethiopia. Peasant perceptions of political control and land policies in Ethiopia’s western lowlands
This paper aims at analysing the most well-known Ethiopian resettlement schemes, i.e. the 1977-1978 and 1985-86 Därg resettlements, in the light of what they have become today. Based on an ethnographic research among resettled peasants in Benishangul-Gumuz and Gambella, the article provides an overview of peasants’ perceptions of state action in these villages under two regimes. It shows how institutional changes since the Därg were seen by peasants, and how political control remained tight in resettlement villages. It then investigates land issues, by showing how current land registration programmes take part in settling the definition of the settlers’ political rights, most notably access to land.

Clara Lecadet, Medareshaw Tafesse Melkamu
The expulsion of Ethiopian workers from Saudi Arabia (2013-2014). The management of a humanitarian and political crisis
Between November 2013 and March 2014, 163,018 Ethiopians were expelled from Saudi Arabia, according to the IOM registration. The high-scale humanitarian operation set up to support the deportees certainly belongs to the “crisis management” framework. The creation of camps around Addis Ababa is emblematic of the incorporation of humanitarian logistics into post-deportation management. But the operation is also to be apprehended as experimental, serving as a test for future operations of reception and reintegration of the deportees. Since the legitimization of forced returns through humanitarian devices and projects funding is central to the policy advocated by the IOM to promote “sustainable returns” and “reintegration”, this post-deportation device should be apprehended within a broader framework of migration management, which involves the IOM, states, NGOs, and private actors. Then, is it still relevant to speak in term of “crisis management”, or did this conjecture allow to test a sustainable model for post-deportation assistance and reintegration programs for deportees?

Thomas Osmond
Turks in Ethiopia/Ethiopians in Turkey. Transregional Circularities and South/South Bilateral Development in Globalization
The current bilateral cooperation between Turkey and Ethiopia is commonly promoted as a successful model of South/ South development policies. Inspired by M. Abélès’ works, this article proposes to reveal the preliminary results of an on-going investigation on its more informal practices across this western Asian and eastern African interface of Globalization. Beyond the official narratives on the formal successes of Turkish/ Ethiopian cooperation, this social field of South/South state development stages more controversial political devices and plural socio-economic actors, interacting at different local, national, and transregional levels throughout the circulation of diverse individuals, merchandises, knowledge, and ideologies.

Benoit Gaudin, Solomon Teka, Samuel Simyiu Mwanga
The Sport Migrations of East African Athletics
The purpose of this paper is to describe the sociological structure and organization of the East African migrating chain of commercial professional athletics. How is this migration chain shaped? What are its different steps? What are the starting points, ending points and hubs? In first instance, this article aims to be descriptive, focusing on the several social actors who participate to each segment. In the first part, it presents the ‘pull factors’, the attracting forces existing in horst countries, mostly but not exclusively in terms of economic revenues. The second part describes the African auxiliaries of the migratory chain and the collective organization which enable migrations. The third part is more analytical, unveiling the political dimensions, at the community and the ethnicity levels, of this migration chain. The paper is based on data collected during a long term fieldwork study conducted on both sides of the migration chain. First-hand data were collected through interviews with stakeholder and witnesses of the athletics migrating chain, including officials and journalists, active and retired athletes, coaches and agents. Second-hand data were gathered from Ethiopian, Kenyan, European and North-American media and websites.

VARIA / MISCELLANEOUS

Giuseppe Ferraro
From the mountains of Africa to Italy. The experience of Ethiopian deportees confined in Longobucco (Calabria) in the period 1937-1943
This paper presents the initial results of an extensive research project concerning the deportation of Ethiopian subjects to Italy after the conquest of Ethiopia. This work specifically deals with the situation and conditions of the Ethiopians held at the internment centre of Longobucco in the Calabria region. The number of Ethiopian internees held at this site and the time they spent there may be considered worthy of note in the general context of the confinement practices of that period. Reference is made to the social and cultural aspects of the life of the Ethiopian deportees, as well as to the various relationships they managed to develop with the Italian authorities and the local population in order to live and survive in a place that differed greatly from the environment they were used to. It is also interesting to note how the attitude of the central and peripheral authorities towards the internees changed over the years, following the enactment of racial laws, the outbreak of war, and the different institutional order introduced in Italy after 1943 in particular.

DOCUMENTS

Jean-François Faü
About the colophon of a 19ᵗʰ century Harari musḥaf
This colophon of a Harari manuscript had been copied in duplicate and got in Harar and in Alexandria. It shows a donation in favor of a mosque of this town of Harar.

*************

Elisabeth Biasio, Peter R. Gerber
Le retour de la couronne du Kafa de la Suisse à l’Éthiopie: un cas de restitution ?
Le sujet de cet article est de savoir si le retour de la couronne et du trône du Kafa de Suisse en Éthiopie en 1954 est un « cas de restitution ». Les circonstances de ce retour et les raisons pour lesquelles la couronne et le trône sont qualifiés « d’objets restitués » à l’Institute of Ethiopian Studies doivent être discutées. L’histoire de la couronne commence en 1897, lorsque l’empereur Ménélik II fait la conquête du royaume du Kafa, dans le sud -ouest éthiopien, et entre en possession de la couronne du roi du Kafa. Parce que Ménélik craignait que la couronne puisse être volée et ramenée au Kafa, il demanda à son conseiller suisse, l’ingénieur Alfred Ilg, de s’assurer que la couronne soit sortie du pays. Lorsque l’empereur Haile Selassie I visita la Suisse en 1954, des membres de la famille Ilg lui remirent la couronne et il la ramena en Éthiopie. Ce rapatriement est-il un cas de restitution selon la « Convention de l’Unesco de 1970 » ou la « Convention d’Unidroit de 1995 » ? Comment devrions-nous comprendre le rapatriement de la couronne par rapport à, par exemple, la restitution de la stèle d’Aksum en 2008 ? Ces questions intéressent les conservateurs de musées qui traitent de cas similaires. Cependant, le cas de la couronne du Kafa semble être très singulier.

Marie Huber
Faire du patrimoine éthiopien un patrimoine mondial: le rôle de l’Unesco dans la reconnaissance du patrimoine culturel et naturel éthiopien
L’expertise étrangère a été dès le début très influente dans la production du patrimoine éthiopien. Lorsque l’Éthiopie a ratifié la Convention du patrimoine mondial de l’Unesco en 1972, cela a ouvert la voie à la reconnaissance du patrimoine éthiopien au niveau international, en soutenant l’institutionnalisation du patrimoine au sein de l’administration de l’État éthiopien lui-même. Cependant, la présence d’organisations internationales concernées par la conservation et le développement du patrimoine dans le pays, parmi lesquelles l’Unesco, est antérieure à l’arrivée du patrimoine mondial. C’est une période pour laquelle peu d’études ont été réalisées à ce jour. Cet article retrace les premières activités de l’Unesco en ce qui concerne la fabrication du patrimoine éthiopien de 1960 aux années 1980, dans le cadre du développement institutionnel du patrimoine en Éthiopie. Cette histoire des politiques de conservation sur le terrain éthiopien devrait contribuer à une recherche plus large qui vise à comprendre les liens entre les dynamiques globales et locales de la fabrique du patrimoine, ainsi que la place des institutions, tant nationales qu’internationales, dans ces dynamiques.

Girma Tayachew Asmelash
La faune sauvage du Simen sous la protection du gouvernement d’Hailé Sélassié: de proie menacée à symbole national (1941-1969)
Cet article a pour principal objectif la reconstruction de l’histoire de la découverte du walia ibex. Celle-ci date de la création du Simen Mountains National Park comme site patrimonial. Bien que la géographie physique du parc tout comme le walia ibex ont déjà été bien étudiés, peu de choses sont connues concernant ce qu’il s’est exactement passé avant l’établissement du parc. Cette étude s’appuie sur des recherches menées dans les archives du North Gondar Zone Administration Office, sur des entretiens avec certains des acteurs historiques, et sur des documents publiés et non publiés. En 1963, après la mission fondatrice de l’UNESCO qui établit le walia ibex comme l’un des animaux endémiques de l’Éthiopie, le gouvernement éthiopien et les agences étrangères décident de protéger le walia ibex. Le Simen Mountains National Park fut établi en 1969. Néanmoins, pendant six ans, alors que les montagnes du Simen étaient déjà supposées être gouvernées comme un parc national dès 1963, non seulement la société locale rejetait les nouvelles lois et régulations, mais la région demeurait également un lieu de chasse à la fois pour les populations locales et les représentants éthiopiens.

Judy Jaffe-Schagen
Créer l’espace: la construction d’une mémoire et d’un patrimoine éthiopiens en Israël
Trente ans après la première immigration de masse de juifs éthiopiens en Israël, le statut de la communauté éthiopienne qui compte aujourd’hui plus de 138 000 individus n’approche toujours pas celui de la population générale juive. Beaucoup de personnes au sein du gouvernement, d’organisations non gouvernementales et de la communauté ont finalement vu la reconnaissance du patrimoine juif éthiopien comme une solution-miracle à ce problème d’intégration. En observant ce qui a été fait concernant le patrimoine des immigrants juifs éthiopiens en Israël, cet article se propose de déterminer le rôle que le patrimoine et la mémoire peuvent jouer pour l’intégration de la communauté. Je passe en revue les mémoriaux, les expositions et les voyages de « retour à vos racines », et j’observe les attentes que les autorités gouvernementales, les acteurs privés et les chefs de la communauté en ont. Selon moi, la mise en valeur du patrimoine juif éthiopien trente ans après leur arrivée en Israël n’aura pas l’effet escompté sur leur intégration.

Zelalem Teferra
Renouvellement urbain et situations délicates de la conservation du patrimoine à Addis-Abeba, Éthiopie
Cet article explore les défis de la réhabilitation et de la conservation des anciens quartiers urbains et des monuments historiques d’Addis-Abeba à la lumière des rapides activités de réaménagement urbain qui se déroulent dans la ville depuis 2004. Les transformations physiques urbaines doivent s’adapter aux nouveaux standards de la vie courante et au zèle moderniste des planificateurs qui cherchent à améliorer l’environnement urbain par l’évacuation des quartiers pauvres. L’article examine comment cette contrainte organise la conservation du patrimoine, souvenir du tissu social originel, ainsi que le maintien de son caractère urbain et de ses caractéristiques architecturales traditionnelles. L’article se conclut par une discussion sur la nécessité d’une approche multidimensionnelle pour conserver les patrimoines culturels urbains, principalement des bâtiments et des monuments historiques. Il suggère également la préservation et la revitalisation d’importants anciens quartiers urbains d’Addis-Abeba avec comme objectif de maintenir le tissu urbain typique, les qualités essentielles des quartiers historiques et de la vie sociale des communautés qui y résident, tout en adaptant leurs structures physiques et leurs activités aux besoins actuels lorsque cela est possible. L’article recommande en outre l’utilisation de techniques de conservation innovantes, les progrès de la technologique numérique moderne. Pour ce faire, la documentation textuelle et numérique des anciens quartiers d’Addis-Abeba a été proposée pour préserver la mémoire populaire, et pour permettre au processus de redéveloppement de se poursuivre sans interruption alors que la préservation physique du vieux tissu urbain est jugée difficile ou est rendue presque impossible.

Perrine Duroyaume
Discours et pratiques autour du patrimoine dans une métropole en reconstruction
Construites lors de la fondation d’Addis-Abeba par les hauts dignitaires de l’empire, les demeures anciennes sont reconnues comme patrimoine par les autorités publiques depuis le début des années 1980. Leur style architectural, mélange d’influences étrangères marquées par un cachet éthiopien, en fait un patrimoine remarquable dans le paysage urbain. Pour autant, les inventaires successifs menés par la municipalité d’Addis-Abeba n’aboutissent que très rarement à la restauration des demeures dont les usages souvent inadaptés ont accéléré les dégradations. La disparition progressive de ce patrimoine, amplifiée par les chantiers de modernisation urbaine, préoccupe les chercheurs et associations qui sonnent régulièrement l’alarme. Comment expliquer un tel décalage entre reconnaissance publique des demeures anciennes et absence d’une politique volontariste de sauvegarde en leur faveur ? Pour y répondre, cet article interroge les représentations divergentes sur la place de ce patrimoine au sein d’une capitale, symbole d’un État en reconstruction. À travers la littérature sur Addis-Abeba produite par des chercheurs européens et éthiopiens, les demeures anciennes sont vues comme un témoignage de la fondation de l’Empire et d’une mixité sociale unique. Les autorités publiques affichent de fortes contradictions et discontinuités vis-à-vis de la sauvegarde de ce patrimoine. Au-delà des tensions sur leur valeur patrimoniale, l’article explore les pratiques des propriétaires (particuliers, religieux, publics et communautaires) qui entretiennent les bâtiments selon des logiques distinctes montrant la diversité mais aussi le manque de cadre dans les initiatives de restauration. Il s’achève sur une réflexion autour de l’actualité avec la décision municipale de restaurer plusieurs demeures anciennes dans une logique de développement touristique.

Metasebia Bekele
La mémoire des héros: l’expérience konso
La culture konso a encouragé l’héroïsme et, par conséquent, a honoré les héros (hedalitas) dont les performances sont reconnues par la communauté. Les guerres fréquentes contre les communautés voisines et entre les différents villages konso ont, pour une grande part, caractérisé l’histoire konso. Les hommes, qui victorieusement tuaient un ennemi, gagnaient le respect de la société à laquelle ils appartenaient. De manière tout aussi importante, ceux qui tuaient un des grands animaux sauvages jouissaient du même honneur. Depuis au moins 19 générations, la perception konso de l’héroïsme a été exprimée par l’érection de monuments sur la tombe des héros. Ils immortalisaient leurs héros en érigeant des monuments : des statues en bois nommées waka et des monuments en pierre, les degadiruma. Cet article tente de décrire la tradition konso d’érection de monuments. Il est essentiellement consacré aux statues en bois, les waka, et tente de présenter le processus complet, c’est-à-dire de la fabrication à l’érection. Il met également en lumière la raison pour laquelle les waka ne doivent pas être uniquement considérés pour leurs valeurs artistiques, puisque ces statues sont les témoins de la manière dont les communautés «inscrivent » leur histoire sur leurs territoires.

Yohannes Gebre Selassie
Le futur du passé: vers la conservation des sites et des objets archéologiques non-documentés dans le Tegray (Éthiopie)
La destruction et le pillage des sites archéologiques ont miné les efforts de préservation du patrimoine culturel au Tegray. Ce problème a été aggravé par l’ouverture de nouvelles routes reliant Wereda aux unités administratives de Tabia, ainsi que par d’autres activités de développement et d’urbanisation. Depuis la publication du répertoire des sites pré-aksumites et aksumites trouvés au Tegray par Eric Godet il y a quatre décennies, de nombreux sites se sont révélés aux chercheurs. Cet article se concentre sur des sites archéologiques peu connus ou jusqu’alors inconnus et des matériaux archéologiques qui ont été récupérés par des villageois sur différents sites, mais qui n’ont jamais été catalogués ni par des chercheurs ni par le Tegray Culture and Tourism Bureau (TCTB) ou l’Authority for Research and Conservation of the Cultural Heritage (ARCCH). En plus de souligner les principaux facteurs de destruction des sites archéologiques non documentés et des objets matériels non catalogués, le but de cet article est d’élargir et d’affiner notre compréhension a n de lutter contre le pillage et la destruction du patrimoine culturel au Tegray. Cet article est basé sur l’expérience personnelle de l’auteur en tant que (ancien) agent du tourisme et du patrimoine (au TCTB) ainsi que sur un vaste travail sur le terrain effectué depuis mars 2010.

DIFFERENT FACES OF MIGRATION IN AND FROM ETHIOPIA

Mehdi Labzaé
Les migrations sponsorisées par l’État en Éthiopie: Les perceptions paysannes du contrôle politique et des politiques foncières dans les basses-terres de l’Ouest éthiopien
Cet article analyse les projets éthiopiens les plus connus de réinstallation, i. e. les réinstallations de l’époque du Därg en 1977-1978 et 1985-1986, à la lumière de ce qu’ils sont devenus aujourd’hui. En s’appuyant sur une recherche ethnographique auprès de paysans réinstallés au Benishangul-Gumuz et à Gambella, cet article propose une vue d’ensemble de la perception des paysans vis-à-vis des actions de l’État dans ces villages sous deux régimes. Il montre la manière dont les changements institutionnels depuis le Därg ont été perçus par les paysans, et la manière dont le contrôle politique reste serré dans les villages de réinstallation. Enfin, il étudie les problèmes fonciers, en montrant comment les actuels programmes d’enregistrement foncier participent à la fixation de la définition des droits politiques des «réinstallés», notamment pour l’accès à la terre.

Clara Lecadet, Medareshaw Tafesse Melkamu
L’expulsion des travailleurs éthiopiens d’Arabie Saoudite (2013-2014): la gestion d’une crise humanitaire et politique
Selon la déclaration de l’IOM, entre novembre 2013 et mars 2014, 163 018 Éthiopiens furent expulsés d’Arabie Saoudite. L’opération humanitaire à grande échelle mise en place pour soutenir les déportés appartient certainement au système de « gestion de crise ». La création de camps autour d’Addis-Abeba est emblématique de l’intégration de la logistique humanitaire dans la gestion post -déportation. Mais l’opération doit aussi être comprise comme expérimentale, en servant de test pour de futures opérations d’accueil et de réinsertion des déportés. Étant donné que la légitimation des retours forcés par les mécanismes humanitaires et le financement des projets est au cœur de la politique préconisée par l’IOM pour promouvoir les « retours durables » et la « réintégration », ce dispositif post-déportation devrait être envisagé dans le cadre plus large de la gestion des migrations, qui implique l’IOM, les États, les ONG et les acteurs privés. Est -il alors encore pertinent de parler en terme de « gestion de crise » ou cette conjoncture a-t-elle permis de tester un modèle durable pour les programmes d’assistance et de réinsertion post-déportation pour les déportés ?

Thomas Osmond
Turcs en Éthiopie / Éthiopiens en Turquie: circularités trans-régionales et développement bilatéral Sud/Sud dans la mondialisation
L’actuelle coopération bilatérale entre la Turquie et l’Éthiopie est généralement présentée comme un modèle de réussite des politiques de développement Sud/Sud. Inspiré par les travaux de M. Abélès, cet article présente les résultats préliminaires d’une enquête en cours sur les pratiques plus informelles de cette interface de la mondialisation entre l’Asie occidentale et l’Afrique de l’Est. Au-delà des récits of ciels sur les succès formels de la coopération turque / éthiopienne, ce domaine social du développement de l’État Sud/ Sud comporte des dispositifs politiques plus controversés et des acteurs socio-économiques multiples, interagissant à différents niveaux local, national et trans-régional, tout au long de la circulation des divers individus, marchandises, savoirs et idées.

Benoit Gaudin, Solomon Teka, Samuel Simyiu Mwanga
Les migrations sportives des athlètes est-africains
L’objectif de cet article est de décrire la structure et l’organisation sociologique des chaînes migratoires est-africaines de l’athlétisme professionnel et commercial. Comment cette chaîne migratoire prend-elle forme ? Quelles en sont les différentes étapes ? Quels en sont les points de départ, les points finaux et le coeur ? En premier lieu, cet article se veut descriptif, en s’intéressant à différents acteurs sociaux qui participent à chaque étape. Dans la première partie, il présente les «facteurs d’attraction » , les forces d’attraction existant dans les pays d’accueil, principalement mais pas exclusivement en termes de revenus économiques. La deuxième partie décrit les auxiliaires africains de la chaîne migratoire et l’organisation collective qui permettent les migrations. La troisième partie est plus analytique, en dévoilant les dimensions politiques de cette chaîne migratoire, aux niveaux communautaires et ethniques. L’article est basé sur des données collectées au cours d’un long terrain de recherche mené aux deux extrémités de la chaîne migratoire. Les données de première main ont été collectées par le biais d’entretiens auprès des acteurs et des témoins des chaînes migratoires d’athlétisme, ce qui inclut des of ciels et des journalistes, des athlètes actifs ou retraités, des entraîneurs et des agents. Les données de seconde main ont été rassemblées à partir de médias et de sites internet éthiopiens, kényans, européens et nord-américains.

VARIA / MISCELLANEOUS

Giuseppe Ferraro
Des montagnes d’Afrique à l’Italie: L’expérience des déportés éthiopiens confinés à Longobucco (Calabre) au cours de la période 1937-1943
Cet article présente les premiers résultats d’une vaste recherche sur la déportation d’Éthiopiens en Italie après la conquête de l’Éthiopie. L’analyse est notamment axée sur les personnes emprisonnées à Longobucco, une petite commune du sud de l’Italie. Dans cet essai, l’auteur présente les aspects sociaux et culturels de la vie des déportés éthiopiens mais aussi les relations qu’ils entretenaient avec les autorités et la population locale. Ils devaient survivre dans un contexte très différent de celui dans lequel ils vivaient en Éthiopie. La façon dont ils étaient traités est également analysée, en particulier après les lois raciales, la Seconde Guerre mondiale et l’ordre institutionnel différent de l’Italie après 1943.

DOCUMENTS

Jean-François Faü
À propos du colophon d’un musḥaf harari du XIXᵉ siècle
Un musḥaf harari du XIXe siècle fut copié en deux exemplaires qui sont conservés à Harar et à Alexandrie. Le colophon de ce manuscrit indique une donation au profit d’une mosquée de la ville-émirat de Harar au lendemain de l’évacuation des troupes égyptiennes.


Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.